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/unit/pkg/docker/
H A DDockerfile.jsc11diff 2198:ea073fb3cb75 Mon Sep 12 23:26:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.28.0.
diff 2119:8a9055cbe4ff Thu Jun 02 00:31:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.27.0.
diff 2008:2be7b623fbfa Thu Nov 18 12:48:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.26.0.
diff 1946:54ffe5ce4fb3 Thu Aug 19 14:52:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.25.0.
diff 1892:847c88d10f26 Thu May 27 13:07:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.24.0.
diff 1835:49ee24c03f57 Thu Mar 25 14:15:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.23.0.
diff 1794:331bdadeca30 Thu Feb 04 15:22:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.22.0.
diff 1723:f804aaf7eee1 Thu Nov 19 18:12:00 UTC 2020 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.21.0.
diff 1641:f7e9cf490512 Thu Oct 08 15:32:00 UTC 2020 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.20.0.
H A DDockerfile.minimaldiff 2198:ea073fb3cb75 Mon Sep 12 23:26:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.28.0.
diff 2119:8a9055cbe4ff Thu Jun 02 00:31:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.27.0.
diff 2008:2be7b623fbfa Thu Nov 18 12:48:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.26.0.
diff 1946:54ffe5ce4fb3 Thu Aug 19 14:52:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.25.0.
diff 1892:847c88d10f26 Thu May 27 13:07:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.24.0.
diff 1835:49ee24c03f57 Thu Mar 25 14:15:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.23.0.
diff 1794:331bdadeca30 Thu Feb 04 15:22:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.22.0.
diff 1723:f804aaf7eee1 Thu Nov 19 18:12:00 UTC 2020 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.21.0.
diff 1641:f7e9cf490512 Thu Oct 08 15:32:00 UTC 2020 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.20.0.
diff 1571:86cdf66f8274 Thu Aug 13 16:22:00 UTC 2020 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.19.0.
H A DDockerfile.node16diff 2198:ea073fb3cb75 Mon Sep 12 23:26:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.28.0.
diff 2119:8a9055cbe4ff Thu Jun 02 00:31:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.27.0.
diff 2008:2be7b623fbfa Thu Nov 18 12:48:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.26.0.
H A DDockerfile.php8.1diff 2198:ea073fb3cb75 Mon Sep 12 23:26:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.28.0.
diff 2119:8a9055cbe4ff Thu Jun 02 00:31:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.27.0.
H A DDockerfile.ruby3.1diff 2198:ea073fb3cb75 Mon Sep 12 23:26:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.28.0.
diff 2119:8a9055cbe4ff Thu Jun 02 00:31:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.27.0.
H A DDockerfile.python3.10diff 2198:ea073fb3cb75 Mon Sep 12 23:26:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.28.0.
diff 2119:8a9055cbe4ff Thu Jun 02 00:31:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Generated Dockerfiles for Unit 1.27.0.
/unit/
H A DCHANGESdiff 2197:a9ac98dad105 Tue Sep 13 08:27:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Added version 1.28.0 CHANGES.
diff 2118:6f079e545a0c Thu Jun 02 12:30:00 UTC 2022 Andrei Zeliankou <zelenkov@nginx.com> Added version 1.27.0 CHANGES.
diff 2007:cbda5bd95b2f Thu Nov 18 12:48:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Added version 1.26.0 CHANGES.
diff 1945:0cb39c311234 Thu Aug 19 14:48:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Added version 1.25.0 CHANGES.
diff 1945:0cb39c311234 Thu Aug 19 14:48:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Added version 1.25.0 CHANGES.
diff 1891:5ae5e6619af9 Thu May 27 13:06:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Added version 1.24.0 CHANGES.
diff 1834:84a836199eb9 Thu Mar 25 14:14:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Added version 1.23.0 CHANGES.
diff 1793:893028bce837 Thu Feb 04 15:22:00 UTC 2021 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Added version 1.22.0 CHANGES.
diff 1722:8d987b7880f9 Thu Nov 19 16:59:00 UTC 2020 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Added version 1.21.0 CHANGES.
diff 1643:0e985b300673 Thu Oct 08 16:04:00 UTC 2020 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Updated 1.20.0 CHANGES to include pytest migration.
diff 1643:0e985b300673 Thu Oct 08 16:04:00 UTC 2020 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Updated 1.20.0 CHANGES to include pytest migration.
/unit/src/
H A Dnxt_http_return.cdiff 2101:39785641d1a2 Tue May 17 09:18:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed memcpy(dest, NULL, 0) Undefined Behavior.

nxt_str_null() setted the loc.start pointer to NULL, which was
being passed to memcpy(3) through nxt_debug(). That caused
Undefined Behavior, so we now pass an empty string.
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
diff 2081:c68e6afffb84 Tue Apr 05 09:47:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Supporting variables in "location".

............
Description:
............

Before this commit, the encoded URI could be calculated at
configuration time. Now, since variables can only be resolved at
request time, we have different situations:

- "location" contains no variables:

In this case, we still encode the URI in the conf structure, at
configuration time, and then we just copy the resulting string
to the ctx structure at request time.

- "location" contains variables:

In this case, we compile the var string at configure time, then
when we resolve it at request time, and then we encode the
string.

In both cases, as was being done before, if the string is empty,
either before or after resolving variables, we skip the encoding.

...........
Usefulness:
...........

An example of why this feature may be useful is redirecting HTTP
to HTTPS with something like:

"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "https://${host}${uri}"
}

.....
Bugs:
.....

This feature conflicts with the relevant RFCs in the following:

'$' is used for Unit variables, but '$' is a reserved character in
a URI, to be used as a sub-delimiter. However, it's almost never
used as that, and in fact, other parts of Unit already conflict
with '$' being a reserved character for use as a sub-delimiter, so
this is at least consistent in that sense. VBart suggested an
easy workaround if we ever need it: adding a variable '$sign'
which resolves to a literal '$'.

......
Notes:
......

An empty string is handled as if "location" wasn't specified at
all, so no Location header is sent.

This is incorrect, and the code is slightly misleading.

The Location header consists of a URI-reference[1], which might be
a relative one, which itself might consist of an empty string[2].

[1]: <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc7231#section-7.1.2>
[2]: <https://stackoverflow.com/a/43338457>

Now that we have variables, it's more likely that an empty
Location header will be requested, and we should handle it
correctly.

I think in a future commit we should modify the code to allow
differentiating between an unset "location" and an empty one,
which should be treated as any other "location" string.

.................
Testing (manual):
.................

{
"listeners": {
"*:80": {
"pass": "routes/str"
},
"*:81": {
"pass": "routes/empty"
},
"*:82": {
"pass": "routes/var"
},
"*:83": {
"pass": "routes/enc-str"
},
"*:84": {
"pass": "routes/enc-var"
}
},
"routes": {
"str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "foo"
}
}
],
"empty": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": ""
}
}
],
"var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "$host"
}
}
],
"enc-str": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o#o"
}
}
],
"enc-var": [
{
"action": {
"return": 301,
"location": "f%23o${host}#o"
}
}
]
}
}

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:80
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: foo
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:06 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:81
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:08 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: localhost
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:15 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: bar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: bar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 23:30:29 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - localhost:83
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:23 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: " localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23o#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:44 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: alx" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%23oalx#o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:22:52 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: a#l%23x" localhost:84
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: f%2523oa#l%2523x%23o
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:23:09 GMT
Content-Length: 0

$ curl --dump-header - -H "Host: b##ar" localhost:82
HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Location: b#%23ar
Server: Unit/1.27.0
Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 11:25:01 GMT
Content-Length: 0
H A Dnxt_time.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_service.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_cache.cdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_dyld.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_buf_pool.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_malloc.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_mem_map.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_vector.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_djb_hash.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_thread_time.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_source.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_mem_zone.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_lvlhsh.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 30:0d768946dbf4 Mon Apr 10 14:25:00 UTC 2017 Valentin Bartenev <vbart@nginx.com> Removed unused nxt_lvlhsh_ctx_t.
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_log_moderation.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_atomic.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
H A Dnxt_list.hdiff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 2084:7d479274f334 Sat Apr 30 17:20:00 UTC 2022 Alejandro Colomar <alx.manpages@gmail.com> Fixed #define style.

We had a mix of styles for declaring function-like macros:

Style A:
#define \
foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

Style B:
#define foo() \
do { \
... \
} while (0)

We had a similar number of occurences of each style:

$ grep -rnI '^\w*(.*\\' | wc -l
244
$ grep -rn 'define.*(.*)' | wc -l
239

(Those regexes aren't perfect, but a very decent approximation.)

Real examples:

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/^nxt_double_is_zero/,/^$/p'
nxt_double_is_zero(f) \
(fabs(f) <= FLT_EPSILON)

$ find src -type f | xargs sed -n '/define nxt_http_field_set/,/^$/p'
#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

I'd like to standardize on a single style for them, and IMO,
having the identifier in the same line as #define is a better
option for the following reasons:

- Programmers are used to `#define foo() ...` (readability).
- One less line of code.
- The program for finding them is really simple (see below).

function grep_ngx_func()
{
if (($# != 1)); then
>&2 echo "Usage: ${FUNCNAME[0]} <func>";
return 1;
fi;

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)^\$[\w\s*]+?^$1\(.*?^}";

find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs grep -l "$1" \
| sort \
| xargs pcregrep -Mn "(?s)define $1\(.*?^$" \
| sed -E '1s/^[^:]+:[0-9]+:/&\n\n/';
}

$ grep_ngx_func
Usage: grep_ngx_func <func>

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_http_field_set
src/nxt_http.h:98:

#define nxt_http_field_set(_field, _name, _value) \
do { \
(_field)->name_length = nxt_length(_name); \
(_field)->value_length = nxt_length(_value); \
(_field)->name = (u_char *) _name; \
(_field)->value = (u_char *) _value; \
} while (0)

$ grep_ngx_func nxt_sprintf
src/nxt_sprintf.c:56:

u_char * nxt_cdecl
nxt_sprintf(u_char *buf, u_char *end, const char *fmt, ...)
{
u_char *p;
va_list args;

va_start(args, fmt);
p = nxt_vsprintf(buf, end, fmt, args);
va_end(args);

return p;
}

................
Scripted change:
................

$ find src -type f \
| grep '\.[ch]$' \
| xargs sed -i '/define *\\$/{N;s/ *\\\n/ /;s/ //}'
diff 382:0b999f4f3545 Mon Nov 20 14:08:00 UTC 2017 Max Romanov <max.romanov@nginx.com> Fixing Coverity warnings.

CID 200496
CID 200494
CID 200490
CID 200489
CID 200483
CID 200482
CID 200472
CID 200465
0:a63ceefd6ab0 Tue Jan 17 17:00:00 UTC 2017 Igor Sysoev <igor@sysoev.ru> Initial version.
/unit/pkg/deb/
H A DMakefile.python37diff 1225:0f35b3937026 Thu Oct 03 14:46:00 UTC 2019 Andrei Belov <defan@nginx.com> Merged with the default branch.
diff 1144:b651ff72ffe0 Fri Aug 23 12:18:00 UTC 2019 Andrei Belov <defan@nginx.com> Packages: bump release for 1.10.0-2.

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